Migraine – When to See a Doctor?

People suffering from Headaches or migraine experience real pain due to which their day-to-day life gets disturbed. However, migraine or headaches don’t indicate any serious health issue as long as they are managed well. But, when a person having regular migraines encounter something unusual suddenly – such as a severe headache than normal, then it is worth paying attention to it and seeking medical help. It is better to consult and talk to your doctor if your symptoms exaggerate all of a sudden.

You know yourself better than anyone else. Therefore, take a note of all your symptoms– to know which is normal and which is not. You will even know whether your symptoms have augmented or whether you would need emergency help.

If you are still in dilemma to judge your symptoms diligently for taking necessary action, then straight away consider taking emergency medical help if you experience the following symptoms:

  • Extremely painful headache – which is sudden
  • Rigidity in the body – unable to move properly
  • Sudden loss of balance, dizziness, sudden weakness
  • Fainting and falling down suddenly
  • Tingling or numbness in hands and legs
  • Delirium, confusion, changes in behaviour
  • Personality changes and seizures
  • Trouble speaking
  • Head drooping to a side
  • Weakness in one hand and leg
  • Rash, stiffness, fever
  • Shortness of breath and stiff neck
  • Appearance of wavy objects
  • Sighting unusual objects and spots or blind spots
  • Disturbances in vision – double vision or blurry vision
  • Sleeplessness due to sudden headache at night
  • Nagging pain making you to remain awake
  • Severe nausea and vomiting

You should also consider seeing a neurologist if you

  • Have headache due to severe head injury or after having a severe fall or accident
  • Develop a new headache which was hitherto not present
  • Get a headache after age 50 – which is for the first time causing problems to you
  • Encounter headache after certain activities such as – bending down, getting up, standing up, coughing, sneezing, after a sexual activity or after any other intense exercise.
  • Have regular headache with a very strong personal history, but quite recently the episodes of attack have changed or new symptoms have manifested

In general headache or migraine and the symptoms associated with them don’t require urgent medical care. However, when you go to see your doctor inform him or her about your case – particularly if you:

  • Have three or more headaches per week
  • Have headaches that are keeping up becoming severe and have become unmanageable.
  • Require over-the-counter pain medicines to check your headaches under control
  • Are taking pain medicines on a regular basis for your headaches.
  • Require more than three to four doses of pain medicines per week to manage headaches and feel better
  • Are disturbed all the time and unable to concentrate on work, family, health and social life